Music Reviews

Exit Human

Arvada

Direct Hit

After 15 minutes of bleeps, blips, and outtakes from Pole Position sound files, Exit Human’s Arvada finally kicks in with some generally Atari-informed electro-hop. Misty analog-synth drones, ether-addled female vocals, slicing bass drops, shape-shifting song-structures, and laconic beats all at the forefront, Arvada is a bedsit’s oasis, the kind of record only a bespectacled white kid with too much time on his hands and computer hardware/software to spare could make. Semantically, some might argue that Exit Human are mining different territory than their IDM (intelligent dance music) contemporaries, but objectively, there’s not a whole lot to differentiate Arvada from, say, Autechre • not like that•s a bad thing, because subjectively, Autechre rule. Otherwise, you’re well advised to ask Ink 19’s own tech-head, Kiran Aditham, about such matters. I mean, I could tell you the semantic and objective differences among black thrash, death thrash, blackened death metal, and doom-death, but this? It•s “good,” semantics aside. Gotta love these word-perfect times, no?

Direct Hit Records, 2594 21st Ave., San Francisco, CA 94116; http://www.exithuman.com


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