Music Reviews

Nonpoint

Development

MCA

On the back of their previous underground success album Statement and the radio hit “What A Day,” Nonpoint look set to hit the big times with this one, their fourth offering. And if they are both subtler and more interesting than most bands operating in a similar vein, that really isn’t saying too much. This is big and pretty dumb “modern” rock, designed to go down well with the young, disenfranchised audience that looks to Staind, Mudvayne, and Linkin Park for comfort. As if that’s going to help them.

“Excessive Reaction” sounds a bit like latter-day Paradise Lost, which is good, but elsewhere they struggle hard to keep their heads above water. And especially so after having played out their best cards early on, with the good, moshable opening title track and the fair-enough rock of “Circles.” The rest of the album is mainly spent going from quiet bits to loud bits in a very polite manner. Some nice moments, then, but way too much filler material makes this seem a bit redundant.

MCA Records: http://www.mcarecords.com


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