Music Reviews

C-Rayz Walz

Ravipops

Definitive Jux

After hearing the Murs release recently, I thought maybe El-P’s Definitive Jux was becoming, perhaps, too prolific, maybe even a little sloppy. Don’t get me wrong. Murs is aiight; but I’ve grown accustomed to a much higher standard from the label that’s brought us Aesop Rock, Cannibal Ox, RJD2 and Mr. Lif (who Rolling Stone recently deemed an artist to watch).

Ravipops has laid all those fears to rest. South Bronx’s latest golden child, C-Rayz Walz (“The Sun Cycle MC” and member of the Stronghold collective) brings it with his idiosyncratic “The Art of Energy” style. Faintly reminiscent of ODB, C-Rayz can definitely flow – like the opening track of this disc claims. Walz’s style is an enigmatic roller coaster ride, twisting and turning around beats like it was caught up in a salt water taffy machine. Nothing overwhelmingly profound here (except “Dead Buffaloes”), but it’s highly entertaining and distinctive. He ain’t bitin’ shit, no bling-blinging, hawking Italian designer clothes, or whatever bullshit’s been clogging up the sewer of radio lately. This is MCing the way it’s supposed to be – with the mic holder carving out his own style to rock the party.

Along with long-time producer/DJ Plain Pat (who’s knocked out some damned good beats), C-Rayz has an impressive debut on his hands. There are a couple songs (and I do mean two out of 17 songs) that could’ve stayed in the studio, but songs like “Elephant Guns,” “‘86” (think Just-Ice’s “Going Way Back” for a new generation), “Buck 80,” “Floe” and “The Essence” make Ravipops a memorable effort.

Neither Def Jux nor its fans have anything to worry about when it comes to the label’s future.

Definitive Jux: http://www.definitivejux.net/


Recently on Ink 19...

Joe Jackson

Joe Jackson

Event Reviews

Joe Jackson brought his Two Rounds of Racket tour to the Lincoln Theatre in Washington D.C. on Monday. Bob Pomeroy was in the area and caught the show.

Matías Meyer

Matías Meyer

Interviews

With only a week to go before powerful new feature Louis Riel or Heaven Touches The Earth premieres in the Main Slate at UNAM International Film Festival, Lily and Generoso sat down for an in-depth conversation with the film’s director, Matías Meyer.

Mostly True

Mostly True

Print Reviews

Carl F. Gauze reviews the fascinating Mostly True: The West’s Most Popular Hobo Graffiti Magazine, a chronicle of forgotten outsider subculture.

The Tin Star

The Tin Star

Screen Reviews

Anthony Mann’s gorgeous monochrome western, The Tin Star, may have been shot in black and white, but its themes are never that easily defined.

Flipside

Flipside

Screen Reviews

Charles DJ Deppner finds Flipside to be a vital treatise on mortality, creativity, and purpose, disguised as a quirky documentary about a struggling record store.