Music Reviews
The Tuna Helpers

The Tuna Helpers

I’ll Have What She’s Having

Web of Mimicry

Falling somewhere near the avant-folk of Joanna Newsom, the cello-based goth group Rasputina and mistress of the uncomfortable piano ballad Tori Amos, The Tuna Helpers make creepily beautiful music that’s more apt to send shivers down your spine than soothe any frayed nerves. Lead singer Adrienne the Anemone’s warble is nasal and pleasant enough to conjure up an act performing on the second stage at the now-defunct Lilith Fair – if there ever was such a thing. It’s the alternation between gentle and sinister in the instrumentation that puts an off-kilter spin on this album. The group places a loping country/carnival frame on the witchcraft ode “Blueberry Head” and tracks it next to the Tim Burton-friendly children’s melody of “Oh No,” then follows it up with guitar-less metal riffery on “Wait and See.” These subtle twists and turns give the disc a multi-genre depth that’s generally lacking in gothic music. This year’s wiccan prom shall have a good soundtrack, indeed.

Web of Mimicry: http://www.webofmimicry.com


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