Screen Reviews
The Break-Up

The Break-Up

directed by Peyton Reed

starring Vince Vaughn & Jennifer Aniston

Universal Pictures

Break-up. It’s a dirty word to some people. They’re also a part of life. Now, Universal Pictures is giving us a new outlook on them – and a good-humored one at that.

The Break-Up is the story of Gary (played by Vince Vaughn) and Brooke (Jennifer Aniston), who live together in a gorgeous condo in Chicago. After a dinner party from hell and a few lemons short of a dozen, things take a turn and the two break up. Yet, neither of them are willing to move out. Each tries to plot various ways to get rid of the other. Yet, nothing works and the two are stuck with each other and a big decision: to sell or not to sell.

The Break-Up

Overall, I was surprised by this movie. After all the negative reviews about this, you would think it was atrocious. It was… cute. If you’re looking for a chick flick, well congratulations. You found one.

Two things made the movie for me. The first thing was Vaughn’s humor. If it lacked that, well… this review would have read a lot differently. Yet, the humor was laced in very well, keeping the movie at a good pace. The other thing that made the movie was the chemistry between the two. Forget whatever the supermarket tabloids say. Vaughn and Aniston play well off of one another and are quite realistic as a couple.

I wouldn’t say it’s the best movie of either of their careers (then again, I’m not really a fan of any of Aniston’s movies), but a good effort. If you need a good date movie, this is a good option. (I know, I know… I mentioned the words chick flick above, but my boyfriend sat through the whole thing and survived)

Either way, if you’re in search for something light and funny, give this a try. Otherwise, save your money and wait for the DVD release.

http://www.thebreakupmovie.net/


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