Music Reviews
Norma

Norma

1

Novoton

It’s kind of refreshing to see an art rock band embracing their pretension as forthrightly as Norma does. In the accompanying press kit for this four-song limited release, the band is touted as a “multidimensional experience” – which in its most basic terms means they have a fancy stage show to go with the ponderous arrangements they’ve wrought. Their music is post-Explosions in the Sky instrumental passages, full of gentle echoing guitars and synths, pooling calmly and awaiting death in the wake of bombastic drums and rock riffs. The group adds some nice vocal touches, but it’s really nothing beyond what bands like Wilderness have been peddling for the last two years or so. Diehard fans of Temporary Residence’s more linear roster entries should find some thrilling moments here, but if you’re jonesing for solid Swedish pop, this will likely not measure up.

Novoton: http://www.novoton.se


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