Music Reviews
Cannonball Adderley with Bill Evans

Cannonball Adderley with Bill Evans

Know What I Mean?

Riverside

This animal so quaintly called “Modern Jazz” covers more territory than you might expect. From the minimalist musings of Chet Baker to the gospel-tinged Ella Fitzgerald to the solitary piano of Thelonious Monk, there are songs for nearly every occasion.

Today we cover the swank and sophisticated ballroom sax sound of Julian “Cannonball” Adderley. Accompanied by the versatile Bill Evans on piano, he begins with “Waltz for Debby.” Its light piano line could serve as the leitmotif for Cinderella or some innocent chanteuse in a Cole Porter comedy. After a few bars, the hopeful and happy sound of Adderley’s sax takes over as men in tuxedos dance with heiresses showing of their jewels of all types. “Goodbye” takes a slower turn – adjectives like “introspective” and “smoky” apply once the Yacht Set returns to Newport and the street-wise Private Eyes, gun molls and petty enforcers arrive to relax after a hard nights work. “Who Cares? (Take 5)” picks up the pace as the sun rises. The night owls fall asleep and the decent people commute to work on ferries and subways and in bright yellow taxi cabs. Life is good, the depression and the war are over, color TV and suburbia prove the world is only getting better. We move on to “Venice” – it’s structurally similar to “Goodbye” both in tempo and chords, and we are at the very core of Adderley’s style. Have we figured out the enigma of this album? “Toy” is upbeat, “Elsa” slow, but then “Nancy (With the Laughing Face)” trips us up by refusing to pick up the tempo. Adderley holds off until the last cut and then drops a Latin bombshell with “Know What I Mean? (Take 7).”

That’s the end of the original release, with the remainder of the disc holding alternate takes on “Who Cares?,” “Toy,” and “Know What I Mean? (Take 12).” Maybe I do know what he means – while this record may perpetuate a Mad Men audio cliché, it’s all starting to make a weird sense.

Concord Music Group: http://www.concordmusicgroup.com


Recently on Ink 19...

Gasoline Lollipops

Gasoline Lollipops

Features

Gasoline Lollipops’ newest single, “Freedom Don’t Come Easy,” is today’s mother lovin’ punk rock folk anthem.

Basket Case

Basket Case

Screen Reviews

Frank Henenlotter’s gory grindhouse classic Basket Case looks as grimy as the streets of Times Square, and that is one of the film’s greatest assets. Arrow Video gives this unlikely candidate a welcome fresh release.

Jimmy Failla

Jimmy Failla

Event Reviews

Despite the Mother’s Day factor, hundreds of fervent, faithful followers still flocked to Orlando’s famed Plaza Live to catch an earlybird set from Jimmy Failla — one of the hottest names on today’s national comedy scene.

Lonnie Walker

Lonnie Walker

Features

Ink 19 readers get an early listen and look at “Cool Sparkling Water,” a new single from Lonnie Walker.

Los Lobos

Los Lobos

Event Reviews

Jeremy Glazier has a bucket list day at a Los Lobos 50th Anniversary show in Davenport, Iowa.

Always… Patsy Cline

Always… Patsy Cline

Archikulture Digest

Carl F. Gauze reviews the not-quite one-woman show, Always… Patsy Cline, based on the true story of Cline’s friendship with Louise Seger, who met the star in l961 and corresponded with Cline until her death.

Lorraine of the Lions

Lorraine of the Lions

Screen Reviews

A lady Tarzan and her gorilla have a rough time adapting to high society in Lorraine of the Lions (1925), one of four silent films on Accidentally Preserved: Volume 5, unleashed by Ben Model and Undercrank Productions, with musical scores by Jon C. Mirsalis.