Music Reviews

Azalia Snail

Breaker Mortar

Dark Beloved Cloud

Oh my god, I love Azalia Snail! She is a beautiful, fascinating woman, who plays beautiful, fascinating music. Words, at least my words, can’t do her dense melodies justice. You simply have to hear them to understand. But of course, I’ve been listening to them for years and only feel I have begun to scratch the surface of what it all means. There is an utter simplicity to her music that belies the complexities lying within. The layers are so tightly wound that you may not always see them upon cursory glance. Layers of vocals, guitars, and on this record, cello and saxophone. I honestly haven’t had enough time to live with Breaker Mortar to fairly rank it with her other albums. I don’t think I like it as well as Fumarole Rising. But I like it quite a lot. I think it may be slightly more accessible to the uninitiated. Although to truly start to appreciate her, one must she her perform live. Azalia and her Rickenbacker guitar may never become famous, but those fortunate to enter her realm will be forever blessed. Dark Beloved Cloud, 516 47th Rd. #3L, Long Island City, NY 11101


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