Gear Reviews

Shop Talk

The Cable Guy

I’ve always admired those individuals who can transform a studio installation project into an aesthetic work of art. Bruce Brisson is just such a person. Brisson is an inventor and entrepreneur whose interest in the fine art of audio cables dates back to the early days of wiring his home stereo. He first discovered the connection between moving speaker cable and its effect upon the sound output. Soon after, he began to wind his own wires with electric drills, experimenting with various gauges, pitches and windings and studying the audio characteristics of different configurations.

While the resistive properties of cables were generally known, Brisson found that cables stored capacitive and inductive energy, which actually made them behave like audio components. He then filed for and was granted several very broad “pioneering” patents that relate to varying the inductors or capacitors used in, on, or around the actual cable. These patents largely focus on reducing noise and making the cable a more ideal transporter of power, without suffering the adverse effects on the audio signal caused by conventional cable designs.

Brisson’s initial experimentation resulted in a Monster Cable product called Interlink Reference, the very first high-performance audiophile cable. That technology is still licensed to Monster Cable and forms the foundation of much of that company’s product line. Brisson went on to found Music Interface Technologies (MIT) in 1984 and has since devoted his creative and technical energies to the design and manufacture of high-end audio and video cables, and AC power line treatment products. With the introduction of the Ripcord guitar and bass cables, MIT has begun its forray into the music industry market. The new musical instruments products group is managed by Bruce Brisson’s oldest son, Tim, himself an engineer and physicist.

Voices Carry

If you’re a singer, then you’ll want to check out Connecting Voices, an on-line magazine designed specifically for singers. Connecting Voices was founded in 1993 and is the only ongoing magazine (print circulation of 20,000) which offers expert advice and other editorial addressing the concerns and issues facing vocalists from all genres. “We are extremely pleased with our readers’ response to our going electronic,” says Dave Stroud, founder of Connecting Voices. “It’s really cool to be able to give readers sound bytes and video clips embedded in our regular articles. This allows them to see and hear exactly what they are reading about.” Connecting Voices features columns by such contributors as legendary vocal coach Seth Riggs (Michael Jackson, Natalie Cole, Stevie Wonder, James Ingram, etc.), entertainment attorney Michael Aczon, internationally renowned vocal and E.N.T. specialist Dr. K. Izdebski, as well as informative and entertaining interviews with singers such as Patty Austin, Shawn Colvin, Todd Rundgren and many more. Check out Connecting Voices’ on-line service at http://www.connectingvoices.com or contact Greg Lee at (650) 947-1915 (email: marketing@connectingvoices.com). ◼


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