Music Reviews

Compiled by God Lives Underwater’s Jeff Turzo, For The Masses is a tip of the glass to genre-defining UK synthpop act Depeche Mode. The cast of musicians is as diverse as they come. From Rabbit In The Moon to The Deftones, Veruca Salt to Monster Magnet, it’s a loving tribute to a band whom the artists credit with the development and subtle influence on their music.

While many of the tracks attempt to maintain the structure of the original compositions, some tracks stray from the formula. UK techno act Apollo Four Forty’s “I Feel You” utilizes a hip-hop sample and Moog to reinterpret the track as if it were a full on remix without changing the tempo. Gus Gus deliver a haunting vocal on “Monument,” but by far the most stirring track would be Rabbit In The Moon’s D&B mash up of “Waiting For the Night,” effectively updating the sound bringing Depeche Mode to the next century as only the Hallucination crew can. Essential for anyone who even remotely was inspired to the dancefloor by this pioneering ’80s outfit.


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