Music Reviews

Oranj Symphonette

The Oranj Album

Rykodisc

This ensemble of studio hands cooks. They don’t cook like a housewife with a bobbed haircut and frilly apron. They cook like a drafted former gourmet chef facing the challenge of feeding a hungry platoon in the middle of the jungle. Assembling an all-star cast of movie themes, The Oranj Album romps through just about every genre and mood imaginable, from the soul-jazz drive of Quincy Jones’ “Call Me Mr. Tibbs” through the distorted polka of “Bananas” and a decidedly moody “Midnight Cowboy,” to mention the highlights. But even the highlights aren’t that much better than most of the material on here – “The Magnificent Seven,” “A Man and a Woman” and Ellington’s “Satin Doll” all get wonderfully Oranj touches. The band not only knows how to pick their material, but also how to add interesting and creative touches to their arrangements. While Oranj Symphonette doesn’t even come close to sounding like Medeski Martin and Wood, both show signs of rock sensibilities to their jazzy instrumentals (or is it vice-versa?). Quite the instrumental masterpiece. Rykodisc, Shetland Park, 27 Congress St., Salem, MA 01970; http://www.rykodisc.com


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