Music Reviews

Kalyanji, Anandji

Bombay the Hard Way: Guns, Cars & Sitars

Motel

In case you didn’t know, the Indian film industry is huge. Really huge. Countless films have been produced in India, and a great many have been musicals. Thus, the Bombay movie companies have produced a tremendous amount of music, as the need for film scores never ends. In the 1970s, two legendary composers Kalyanji, Anandji participated in a fascinating hybrid of style and genre as Indian action movies began to reflect elements of American “Blaxploitation” flicks in both the visual and aural realms. Sitars and tablas clashed with slap bass and funk to provide the soundtrack for the new style of cinematic production. On Bombay the Hard Way , Dan “the Automator” Nakamura (of Dr. Octagon fame) has collected some choice cuts of Kalyanji, Anandji’s work and remastered them. The funk still holds true – even without the accompanying action flicks – and shows the wonderful possibilities that can be hidden within the most unlikely of combinations. Bombay the Hard Way serves to highlight the beauty of “found” music and exemplify the potential contained within an otherwise unbelievable cultural mix.

Motel Records, 210 East 49th St., NYC, NY 10017


Recently on Ink 19...

Joe Jackson

Joe Jackson

Event Reviews

Joe Jackson brought his Two Rounds of Racket tour to the Lincoln Theatre in Washington D.C. on Monday. Bob Pomeroy was in the area and caught the show.

Matías Meyer

Matías Meyer

Interviews

With only a week to go before powerful new feature Louis Riel or Heaven Touches The Earth premieres in the Main Slate at UNAM International Film Festival, Lily and Generoso sat down for an in-depth conversation with the film’s director, Matías Meyer.

Mostly True

Mostly True

Print Reviews

Carl F. Gauze reviews the fascinating Mostly True: The West’s Most Popular Hobo Graffiti Magazine, a chronicle of forgotten outsider subculture.

The Tin Star

The Tin Star

Screen Reviews

Anthony Mann’s gorgeous monochrome western, The Tin Star, may have been shot in black and white, but its themes are never that easily defined.

Flipside

Flipside

Screen Reviews

Charles DJ Deppner finds Flipside to be a vital treatise on mortality, creativity, and purpose, disguised as a quirky documentary about a struggling record store.