Music Reviews

Custom Made Scare

The Greatest Show on Dirt

Side 1

Damn, but this is a great record! I had no idea who Custom Made Scare were when this record showed up, but now I’ll be out to find out whatever I can – to put it simply, they fucking rock! White trash rockabilly-punk played full tilt at high-volume with a sense of humor – you can’t go wrong with song titles like “Peterbilt,” “Wake Up and Smell the Gunpowder,” “White Trash Girl” (which brilliantly swipes a little of the feel of Tom Petty’s “American Girl”), and “Texas Didn’t Wreck Us” (“‘cause we haven’t been there yet”), but the crown jewel is “White and Lazy,” with a spoken bit in the middle that cracks me up every time I hear it. Singer Charlie (he only needs one name) sounds like the bastard child of Lux Interior and Mike Ness, and the band cranks along at MACH 1. Heartily recommended for psychobilly fans, or anyone that likes a good time. Man, what I wouldn’t give to see these guys on a bill with the Amazing Crowns and the Rev. Horton Heat…

Side 1 Recordings, 6201 Sunset Blvd., Suite 211, Hollywood, CA 90028; http://www.side1.com


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