Music Reviews

“electro_dan_the”

Dan Electro & the Silvertones

Reason to Lie

Cattone

The argument of titling a band swing vs. jump blues is a tiring and seemingly fruitless one. However, after listening to Dan Electro & the Silvertones, there now shines a light on the importance of singling out such jump blues. Sure, you can swing to it and it’ll keep your fingers snapping, but the band carries with them a more laid-back, confident attitude with a professional ambiance about it all. Whereas the swing bands of today are focused on keeping a beat and, consequently, have often left out the whole “writing a good song” thing, these tunes here have some brains to them.

Half a cover band, Reason to Lie ‘s songs are a split between originals and remakes of some older numbers. Kicking off the album with a version of Saunders King’s “Swingin’” that puts the Royal Crown Revue’s version to shame, these Silvertones show that there’s more to them than just flashy suits. A house band for the Sugar Palm Club in Sarasota, FL, the band is tight and smooth, not overusing their 3-piece horn section and actually focusing on intelligent and finely crafted vocals.

Also taking from the blues, Dan Electro & the Silvertones even occasionally make way for some solos. A band for those who like more thought and feeling in the music they swing to, Reason to Lie is full of 16 tunes that have a more bluesy and realistic feel that you can actually enjoy sitting down and listening to, too.

Cattone Records, P.O. Box 48991, Sarasota, FL 34230-5991


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