Music Reviews

Train

Drops Of Jupiter

Columbia

On Drops Of Jupiter, the boys of Train continue with the formula that made so many people fans of their self-titled debut. Listening to both albums end-to-end would result in seamless continuation from the first album to the second. Not a band for using the latest gimmicks, Train plays no-frills, rootsy, soulful rock and roll. Taking their cues from singer/songwriter-type classic rock, they can easily hold their own against bands like Counting Crows, The Wallflowers, or Wilco. The songs on Drops Of Jupiter are instant memory makers, courtesy of their catchy choruses and lyrics about fundamental things like life and relationships. It’s refreshing to hear a band whose music is founded in the basics, instead of the latest attention-getting scheme.

Columbia Records, 550 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10027-3211; http://www.trainline.com


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