Music Reviews

Daughters of the Revolution

No Refunds

self-released

The Daughters are a relatively new Gainesville, Florida three-piece that have put out this full-length D.I.Y. CD themselves. To say that the music is hard to describe is an understatement, but that’s not a bad thing at all.

While describing a band as the sum of its parts is difficult, on this occasion, indulge me. For the rhythm section, imagine an amalgam of The Cramps and The Mothers of Invention. A diabolical transplant operation has taken the fingers of Brian Setzer, on a permanent amphetamine rush, and placed them into the body of a singer whose vocal chords have been supplied by The Reverend Horton Heat and The B-52’s Fred Schneider. With lyrics frequently provided by channeling Frank Zappa.

Oh, and I left out the free jazz and hardcore punk. This is interesting, fun, rocking, and challenging. And all those reference points are just that • the band doesn’t much sound like any of those bands in particular. About the only downside is that it was recorded in a warehouse (aside from some live cuts), and pretty much sounds like it was recorded in a warehouse. One can certainly hear everything, and it’s not distorted or anything, but the sound is typically somewhat thin from recording on a budget. Buy this so these guys can afford to get into a recording studio, because this is good stuff.

crazygeorg@earthlink.net

A version of this review also can be found in the July edition of Moon Magazine.


Recently on Ink 19...

Henry V

Henry V

Archikulture Digest

Blood, guts, and kicking butt in France — it’s the age-old story of Shakespeare. Carl F. Gauze once again enjoys the salacious violence and complicated plot points of Henry V, in the moody dark of Orlando Shakes.

New Music Now 011: Nora O’Connor

New Music Now 011: Nora O’Connor

Features

On today’s New Music Now, Judy Craddock talks to our musical guest, Nora O’Connor, about her solo album, My Heart, and the captivating new music she’s listening to right now. Tune in for great music, and more ’90s references than you can shake a scrunchie at.

Big Time Gambling Boss

Big Time Gambling Boss

Screen Reviews

Writer Kazuo Kasahara and director Kôsaku Yamashita transcend genre conventions to create the memorable film Big Time Gambling Boss. Phil Bailey reviews.

Frank Bello

Frank Bello

Features

Frank Bello’s new memoir Fathers, Brothers, and Sons: Surviving Anguish, Abandonment, and Anthrax takes us from a New York childhood, to Anthrax stadium tours, to fatherhood with the charming informality of a conversation with an old friend. Then I’m Gone, Bello’s first solo EP, provides accompaniment. Joe Frietze reviews.

%d bloggers like this: