Music Reviews

Interfearence

Take That Train

Ubiquity

Imagine a very hip, sophisticated place that everyone who’s anyone wants to be. Imagine the pictures on the walls, what everyone is drinking and talking about. Now imagine you can hear the music that’s playing. What’s that you say? Interfearence? I wouldn’t doubt you’d be right on with that guess, because only a hip, sophisticated person would want to be in the place everyone wants to be, listening to the music that everyone who wants to be there is listening to. From the fast moving “Dinheiro” and “Duck” to the popular “Emotionalize” to the creepy downtempo “The Struggle,” Interfearence paves new ground (and in the process is able to throw together an album that only hip, sophisticated people would want to listen to). Aside form the chanting in “Xtradition,” Take That Train is entirely instrumental, but not in a Mozart way. The music takes on a voice so you don’t exactly even notice until you start to sing along… (and this situation is so embarrassing that you skip the hip, sophisticated boy/girl who was going to ask you out at the place everyone wants to be). Oh well. That’s life, and Interfearence is good. Sometimes.

Ubiquity Records, PO Box 192104, San Francisco, CA 94119; http://www.ubiquityrecords.com, http://www.interfearence.com


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