Music Reviews

The Kickovers

Osaka

Fenway

The Kickovers are the new vehicle for Nate Albert, former guitarist for Boston’s pride The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, although you’d be hard pressed to discover that lineage merely by listening to this album, chemically ska-free as it is. A better musical comparison, surely, is Weezer – and hey, what do you know, here is former Weezer bassist Mikey Welsh as well. There you go.

It’s a rather likeable effort, actually, especially bearing in mind The Bosstones’ infectious, untamed energy level and Weezer’s knack for churning out brilliant choruses – and both of those traits certainly define The Kickovers, what with the punkish “Black And Blue,” the jump-along “Put Me On,” and a crackling version of Blondie’s “Hanging on the Telephone.” There’s always room for a new fine power-pop band, and The Kickovers are just that. Don’t expect anything deeply profound or too much originality, but if you’re looking for superbly crafted melodies and a feel-good album to suit the season, this one is for you.

Fenway Recordings: http://www.fenwayrecordings.com


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