Music Reviews

Believe In Toledo

The 12 Step Guide

Milquetoast

Caught somewhere between Jimmy Eat World and Alanis Morissette, Believe In Toledo is far less interesting than that position might imply. While certainly competent enough, their brand of “modern rock” has a problem in deciding whether it should be underground emo or mainstream rock. Now, this could theoretically prove to be a good thing, but the hard facts of this release says it’s not, seeing that it has resulted in an album full of rather bland writing and performances.

Problem is that Believe In Toledo do what so many has done before them, and they do it with less presence and in a less exciting, almost disinterested way. So they end up sounding like an electric, up-tempo sub-version of Counting Crows.

That said, the cover art looks good, and in “Coming From You This Means Even Less,” they have a strong contender for Best Song Title this year. And that’s something.

Believe In Toledo: http://www.believeintoledo.com


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