Music Reviews

Blithe Sons

We Walk the Young Earth

Family Vineyard

The Blithe Sons, a group that is comprised of two-thirds of the group Thuja, has released their third album. The first two, cut straight to CD-R, were released on the Jewelled Antler label, a forum as well as a label for artists that share the Blithe Sons’ sound and vision. On this release, distributed by Family Vineyard, the Blithe Sons continue their sonic explorations by recording their music live in the field. Alternatively described as “field recordings,” We Walk the Young Earth finds a group confident in their ability to meld organic everyday hums, chirps and sounds of the outdoors into the construction of their droning take on folk music. These tracks, recorded at various places such as in a bunker and under a bridge, reflect a confidence in utilizing random textures to heighten their own tracks.

Musically, the tracks rely on a wide variety of instruments to create their ambient influenced folk tracks, tracks that are a bit minding in their sound and scope and resemble nothing familiar to those who equate folk music with the artists of the sixties. These tracks are more akin to John Fahey after swallowing several pages of blotter acid and jamming out to Amon Duul. The tracks mimic the ambient soundscape in which they were recorded, and while they may not be very melodic they do reflect a certain imagination and integrity.

Family Vineyard: http://www.family-vineyard.com/


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