Music Reviews

Beulah

Yoko

Velocette

Yoko is easily Beulah’s darkest release yet, favoring directness over the band’s established brand of Elephant 6-endorsed sunshine pop. The band still churns out some absolutely irresistible tunes, though – it’s the detailed complexity and playfulness of the performances that really set Yoko apart from your regular psych-pop release. Check the wonderful guitar part on “Landslide Baby,” or the lovely, extended last half of album closer “Wipe Those Prints And Run.” Beulah approach their music with unbridled curiosity, lending each song its distinctive nature. And the band’s eye for details pays off: the album is given an air of irresponsible fun, even in the face of the music’s overwhelming melancholy. Yoko may be a bit harder to grasp than Beulah’s former releases, and at times the music’s relative hardness seems vague and detached coming from such a warm-sounding band. But the sheer strength of the album somehow halts any such attempts at criticism. Yoko proves that Beulah remain an exciting and ever-creative band, still able to surprise the listener, even when most of us thought we had them figured out.

Velocette Records: http://www.velocetterecords.com/


Recently on Ink 19...

New Music Now 008: doubleVee

New Music Now 008: doubleVee

Features

Join Ink 19 with Barb and Allan Vest for new music from Sydney, Australia band Bloods, Prey composer Sarah Schachner, and doubleVee’s own latest release, Treat Her Strangely. What was your first cassette tape, hmm?

Hold Me Tight

Hold Me Tight

Screen Reviews

Lily and Generoso review Hold Me Tight, the sixth feature directed by renowned actor Mathieu Amalric. Centered around a brilliant performance from Vicky Krieps (Phantom Thread, Bergman Island), Hold Me Tight is an unpredictable and remarkable psychological drama.

Sirens

Sirens

Screen Reviews

The fact that the band Slaves to Sirens exists is impressive, but that they live, love, and breathe to play metal takes things to another level. Sirens documents the journey. Review by Charles DJ Deppner.