Music Reviews
The Unicorns

The Unicorns

The Unicorns: 2014

Suicide Squeeze

While the b-side of this 7” is called “Emasculate the Masculine,” the single as a whole might as well be titled “Subdue the Spastic.” Since I’ve lived under a rock, in a cave, on Mars for the past year, The Unicorns’ highly touted quirk-pop debut album hasn’t done much more than glancingly graze my ears. I’m left fumbling blindly for an adequate level of comparison, but if Who Will Cut Our Hair When We’re Gone? was the party record I’ve been told it was, The Unicorns: 2014 is the early morning hangover soundtrack. The title track begins with a wobbly synth riff that teeters elliptically over a muffled dance beat while gauzy guitar melodies creep spider-like in the background.

The aforementioned b-side rings last night’s drugs out of an addled brain and injects a whole new batch. Led by a quasi-rumba rhythm and a keyboard line as gooey as melted taffy, the song plays like a Caribbean cruise courtesy of Willy Wonka.

While I won’t go as far as to declare either of these tracks essential, together they’re worth checking out for an established fan. For the rest of us, they’re a fun diversion from the other over-hyped and over-produced hyphenated wave riders.

Suicide Squeeze: http://www.suicidesqueeze.net/


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