Music Reviews
Sky Saw

Sky Saw

Sky Saw

Lithiq

The only reason I wanted this album was because I liked the cover: a picture of a tornado ripping up a barren prairie. After listening to Sky Saw, however, the picture perfectly explains the music. They take everything that is on the surface (squealing guitars, zithers, drum loops and various other electronic sounds) and swirl it together into a tornadic assault on the ears for which The Prodigy would easily trade their psychotic vocalist.

Sky Saw is a side project of the Blue Man Group’s Core Redonnett. He and Yuri Zbitnoff manage to fit 70 minutes of music into four songs, which, admittedly, gets repetitive after a while. I usually listen to the first two or three tracks of an album before I determine whether I like a band or not. The first two tracks on Sky Saw are 42 minutes combined. And what I don’t like about Sky Saw, others will love. They sound a lot like the Blue Man Group, who are great live; but sitting down and listening to zither-driving electro-grunge isn’t exactly what I would call relaxing. I have seen the Blue Man Group perform, and although their music gets slightly annoying, their live show is one of the best you’ll ever see. That’s what Sky Saw needs: some sort of visuals.

I you are into industrial noise and groups like the Blue Man Group, then Sky Saw is a must have. If you’re not (like me), then this is an album that may be better heard live.

Sky Saw: http://www.sky-saw.com


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