Music Reviews
The Wildbirds

The Wildbirds

Golden Daze

PRC

From the sexy opening drum roll that leads into the Chris Robinson-like howl of vocalist Nicholas Stuart, it is apparent that The Wildbirds are not of this era. They are clearly a newly dug up fossil from the bygone decadence of the ’70s. The age of big arena rock, free love and whiskey-soaked tight pants; it is of this time that these Wisconsin boys were bred. Like Tennessee boys Kings of Leon, these dudes sound like the real deal, not a corporately derived attempt at authenticity.

As the opening song, the incredibly strong “421 (Everybody Loves You),” leads way into “Shake Shake” I have found that I have stumbled upon an album that will stay on my playlist for the remainder of this long hot summer. It’s a porch record, even for those without a porch to sit on. It’s a driving record, even for those without a road trip to take advantage of the enhanced experience of repeated listening. It’s at once rockin’ and soulful, and bluesy enough to have depth without being too deep for a mindless sweaty August afternoon romp (turn on “It’s Alright Now” for that one, thank me later).

Closing out this surprising bit of wonderment is the acoustic and soul-dripping “Suzanna.” Very Zeppelin meets Black Crowes, and very very good!

The Wildbirds: http://www.thewildbirds.com


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