Music Reviews
Unsane

Unsane

Visqueen

Ipecac Recordings

I don’t know that I’ve heard such a powerfully heavy band with as much blood in the music as well as the vocal delivery as I have now listening to Unsane’s Visqueen. Hell, even their album covers are bloody. Following in a long line of self made tradition, this disc like their previous ones – dating back to 1991 – has a gory true life photograph of a dead body. It sets the tone for the album before you even have got a chance to take it out of its shrink wrap.

The auditory explosion that awaits inside is a car crash of Black Flag and Slayer. Appearing in NYC around the same time as Page Hamilton’s Helmet, Unsane play a darker shade of the same kind of metal. Their history is a dark as their music – including heroin overdoses, and physical violence that actually put vocalist Chris Spencer in a hospital bed. This is not a sunny band, but it’s a damn intense one.

Released as the introductory disc on Mike Patton’s Ipecac Recordings label, this is the metal record to pick up this year. “Last Man Standing,” “Against the Grain” and “This Stops At the River” are the three songs I’d recommend to a friend as a starter kit to this meal of an album.

Unsane: http://www.theunsane.com


Recently on Ink 19...

Joe Jackson

Joe Jackson

Event Reviews

Joe Jackson brought his Two Rounds of Racket tour to the Lincoln Theatre in Washington D.C. on Monday. Bob Pomeroy was in the area and caught the show.

Matías Meyer

Matías Meyer

Interviews

With only a week to go before powerful new feature Louis Riel or Heaven Touches The Earth premieres in the Main Slate at UNAM International Film Festival, Lily and Generoso sat down for an in-depth conversation with the film’s director, Matías Meyer.

Mostly True

Mostly True

Print Reviews

Carl F. Gauze reviews the fascinating Mostly True: The West’s Most Popular Hobo Graffiti Magazine, a chronicle of forgotten outsider subculture.

The Tin Star

The Tin Star

Screen Reviews

Anthony Mann’s gorgeous monochrome western, The Tin Star, may have been shot in black and white, but its themes are never that easily defined.

Flipside

Flipside

Screen Reviews

Charles DJ Deppner finds Flipside to be a vital treatise on mortality, creativity, and purpose, disguised as a quirky documentary about a struggling record store.