Truth to Power

No jail for activist

Judge refuses to jail activist who hung banner in Senate building, over objection of US Attorney

Environmentalist Ted Glick narrowly escaped a jail sentence today for misdemeanor convictions related to hanging banners in the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building.

“I’m overwhelmingly surprised,” Glick told Raw Story. “I fully expected to go to jail.”

The 60 year-old Bloomfield, NJ resident was convicted May 13 of two misdemeanors–disorderly conduct and unlawfully assembling on Capitol Grounds. He was facing up to three years in prison in today’s sentencing for unfurling two banners saying “Green Jobs Now” and “Get to Work” from the Hart Senate Office Building’s 7th floor into the atrium on Sept. 8, 2009, the day the Senate returned from its summer recess.</em>

Oh, the horror. A citizen uses his freedom of speech to speak the truth to power in their own cozy little kingdom, and faced three years in jail for his insubordination. Glad to see the judge was a more rational sort than the DA.

Now get out there and do it again.


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