Music Reviews
Small Black

Small Black

Small Black EP

Jagjaguwar

New York’s Small Black may look like Suicide’s younger brothers, but their sound is a world removed from the latter’s suffocating aggression. The music that spools out of the Small Black EP is not, in fact, sonically part of the controversial chillwave (non-scene) – eschewing the pained hesitations of Washed Out and the ’80s nostalgia of, well, almost everyone else. Well, I shouldn’t totally lie, I’d be willing to bet that Small Black pine for the ’80s a little, but if so it’s the ’80s in the Lower East Side of New York City. The ’80s of the No New York comp and Ze Records. And a little of the early ’90s of Ride and Slowdive – buying import singles and making sure you couldn’t see underneath a curtain of bangs. The Small Black EP is a bracing mix of lo-fi electro grit and shoegazing whitecaps. Metronomic drum machine loops collide headlong into keyboards and synths plugged into scuzzy distortion pedals, with sad Little Prince vocals swirling about, lost in a fog of tape hiss and echo. The end result is, of course, beautiful. Jagjaguwar has reissued this lil’ gem with two new songs ahead of a full-length in the works. Warr-iors…. come out and plaaaaaaayyyy.

Jagjaguwar: http://www.jagjaguwar.com


Recently on Ink 19...

Joe Jackson

Joe Jackson

Event Reviews

Joe Jackson brought his Two Rounds of Racket tour to the Lincoln Theatre in Washington D.C. on Monday. Bob Pomeroy was in the area and caught the show.

Matías Meyer

Matías Meyer

Interviews

With only a week to go before powerful new feature Louis Riel or Heaven Touches The Earth premieres in the Main Slate at UNAM International Film Festival, Lily and Generoso sat down for an in-depth conversation with the film’s director, Matías Meyer.

Mostly True

Mostly True

Print Reviews

Carl F. Gauze reviews the fascinating Mostly True: The West’s Most Popular Hobo Graffiti Magazine, a chronicle of forgotten outsider subculture.

The Tin Star

The Tin Star

Screen Reviews

Anthony Mann’s gorgeous monochrome western, The Tin Star, may have been shot in black and white, but its themes are never that easily defined.

Flipside

Flipside

Screen Reviews

Charles DJ Deppner finds Flipside to be a vital treatise on mortality, creativity, and purpose, disguised as a quirky documentary about a struggling record store.