Neck Deep

Neck Deep

Neck Deep

with Seaway, Creeper, and Speak Low If You Speak Love

The Plaza Live; Orlando, FL • January 28, 2018

The Peace and The Panic Tour opened with Michigan based “emotional indie rock” band, Speak Low If You Speak Love. Vocalist and guitarist, Ryan Graham has a unique voice that’s unexpectedly soulful. They reminded me a bit of The 1975, but more emo vibes. Their set consisted of mostly songs off of their latest release, Nearsighted.

Speak Low If You Speak Love

Vanna Porter
Speak Low If You Speak Love

Once Creeper took the stage all hell broke loose in the sold out venue. Opening with “Hiding With Boys”, the crowd immediately went off, pits opening left and right. I wasn’t expecting how energetic Creeper is. They give me nostalgia without the actual memories! They’re the perfect new age horror punk band, that I had no idea I needed until now.

Creeper

Vanna Porter
Creeper

Vanna Porter


Vanna Porter


Vanna Porter

Next was Seaway, a band that makes me want to put on some sunglasses and go longboard on Venice Beach. They opened with “Slam” off their first full-length record, Colour Blind. Two songs that really got the crowd yelling were “Airhead” and “Lula on the Beach”. They’re a great pop punk that deserves more recognition.

Seaway

Vanna Porter
Seaway

Vanna Porter


Vanna Porter

As a white banner is hung in front of the stage, I could feel the packed room start to buzz. Shortly after, “Happy Judgement Day” started to play, and the banner dropped revealing Neck Deep. There were moments during that night where I could barely hear Ben Barlow over the hundreds of people screaming the lyrics.

Neck Deep

Vanna Porter
Neck Deep


Vanna Porter


Vanna Porter


Vanna Porter

It felt like the venue was rattling from everyone jumping. Ending the show with an encore, Neck Deep graced the crowd with playing a jam called “Can’t Kick Up the Roots”. The show ended with an ambulance outside, and a lot of smiling faces.

Vanna Porter

www.neckdeepuk.com

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