Music Reviews
Ruark

Ruark

Waiting on a Breeze

South Arkansas-based folk-rock outfit Ruark releases their second album, Waiting on a Breeze, which was recorded in the band’s home studio. The 10 tracks on the album blend various stylistic elements, including folk, rock, hard rock, country, Latin, and pop.

According to vocalist/guitarist Ruark Inman, “We’re hard rock, in a weird acoustic way, but we call it folk rock, cause of all the influences we bring into the music.”

A homegrown band, in addition to Ruark Inman, the band comprises his wife, Alexa Joyce (bass, backing vocals), and her brother, Joseph Bethany (drums, backing vocals). Raw and authentic, Ruark’s sound summons up memories of Tom Petty, both musically and vocally.

High points on the album include “Into The Sun,” a folk-flavored tune with tangs of alt-rock running through it. The song reveal the savors of Bob Dylan crossed with Tom Petty, projecting a rambling motion and deliciously measured, twangy vocals.

Opening on a low-slung acoustic guitar, “Full of Strife” rides a light, shuffling rhythm topped by Inman’s drawling Dylan-esque voice. Soft, radiant harmonies wrap the tune in sighing, blushing textures, adding to the song’s poignancy.

Warm and somewhat upbeat, “Love Is Destiny” reflects the bliss of an enduring relationship. Inspired by a poem written by Alexa Joyce, “By My Side” paints a picture of the heartache following the dissolution of a relationship. The verses feature a fingerpicking guitar, while the chorus elevates to heavier rock tones as Inman pleads for a lovers’ reunion.

The title track ties the album off, narrating the enjoyment found in expectation. “It’s a song about looking forward to spring and the good times at the beginning of a relationship,” says Ruark Inman. “It was inspired by a quote by Ikkyū, a Japanese Zen Buddhist monk and poet.”

Not quite folk, not quite rock, with an air of genuine simplicity that’s enchanting, Waiting on a Breeze conveys an intuitive appeal.

Ruark


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