Patch & Tweak with Moog

Patch & Tweak with Moog

Patch & Tweak with Moog

Kim Bjørn

Bjooks

Back in the day, I had a book called Science and the Universe, part of the Mitchell Beazley Joy of Knowledge library. I still have the book — it’s an encyclopedic tome, almost 300 pages of meticulously-written information on just about any science- or universe-related topic a 10-year-old mind can think of. Unlike the multi-tome encyclopedias of the time, it is heavily illustrated, with only about a quarter or a third of the page taken up by dense text and the rest a variety of diagrams, images, and photographs, each with a dedicated caption.

I have spent more time with this book than any other in my lifetime, and I say that as someone who has read Snow Crash four times. Before there was an internet, this book was my internet, a place where I could casually wander from topic to topic, losing track of time and any external sensory inputs.

Cracking open Patch & Tweak with Moog gives me that same feeling. The world of Moog synthesis (and it should be noted, specifically that world) is mapped out before me. I can be methodical and start at the beginning, with a foreword by noted film composer Hans Zimmer, or flip through the pages, delving into the mechanics of sound synthesis, the history of the Moog company and its products, interviews with a wide variety of Moog-related individuals, and much more. There is no search function, only an index that gives you a rough location for the information you need. Once you’re there, you may need to wander a bit and absorb some related bits and pieces before you find what you’re looking for.

A large part of the book shows you how to generate sound with your Moog devices by explaining basic concepts of synthesis (oscillators, filters, sequencers, etc.), showing you how they relate to specific Moog models and providing some illustrative patches you can apply. This content makes up a sort of extended user manual for owners of Moog products, which may or may not be useful to the reader.

Nonetheless, the bulk of the content remains timeless and universal, especially the interviews with synthesis luminaries like Trent Reznor and Mark Isham, and a well-researched section with Moog history and a product timeline. Like Fender, Gibson, Ludwig, and many other famed musical instrument manufacturers, Moog is more than a brand for a business enterprise. It’s a certain aesthetic, a commitment towards aiming past a contraption that will make some sort of desired sound and hitting a target where the instrument becomes an integral part of the musical identity.

This book does a great job of presenting the many possibilities that these particular collections of electronic parts can offer, and several of the sounds and inspirations their users have been able to discover. If you own a recent Moog product, or have more than a passing interest in getting one, this book is for you.

https://bjooks.com

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Recently on Ink 19...

  • The Lyons
    The Lyons

    A man on his deathbed is surrounded by bickering family members, many of which you would strangle him given the chance. In other words: a brilliant comedy!

  • The Reading Room
    The Reading Room

    Today’s episode features author Anna-Marie O’Brien talking about her book Adventures of a Metalhead Librarian: A Rock N’ Roll Memoir with Ink 19’s Rose Petralia.

  • Bush Tetras
    Bush Tetras

    Rhythm and Paranoia (Wharf Cat). Review by Scott Adams.

  • Tom Tom Club
    Tom Tom Club

    The Good The Bad and the Funky (Nacional). Review by Julius C. Lacking.

  • Barnes & Barnes
    Barnes & Barnes

    Pancake Dream (Demented Punk Records). Review by Carl F. Gauze.

  • Jeremiah Lockwood
    Jeremiah Lockwood

    A Great Miracle: Jeremiah Lockwood’s Guitar Soli Chanukah Album (Reboot). Review by Bob Pomeroy.

  • Metallica: The $24.95 Book
    Metallica: The $24.95 Book

    From an underground band that pioneered the thrash metal sound, to arguably the biggest rock act in the new millennium, Metallica has had a long and tumultuous history. Ben Apatoff scours a myriad of sources to catalog this history in his new book.

  • Araceli Lemos
    Araceli Lemos

    Shortly after AFI Fest 2021 wrapped, Generoso spoke at length with director, Araceli Lemos about her award-winning and potent feature debut, Holy Emy. Lemos’s film uses elements of body horror in her story about the exoticization of two Filipina sisters living in Greece and how that exploitation creates a distance between them.

  • Southern Accents 55
    Southern Accents 55

    A woofin’ good time with cuts from Hank Williams, Muddy Waters, Delta Moon and more from KMRD 96.9, Madrid, New Mexico!

  • Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead
    Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

    Absurdism with a healthy dose of air conditioning.

From the Archives