Music Reviews
Landon Lloyd Miller

Landon Lloyd Miller

Light Shines Through

Twin Mesa

Landon Loyd Miller’s debut album Light Shines Through is a fascinating introduction to an artist whose own light as a solo singer-songwriter is shining through bright as the sun. The various influences present in the album are a direct reflection of his varied background, from his time as the front man of the Shreveport based The Wall Chargers, to his work in the Texas Hill Country as a winemaker. It’s deeply personal while giving fans a mix of funky jazz, folky blues, and big ballads that highlight his amazing vocal vibrato.

The album opens with “Light Is Growing,” a song that could have just as easily been sung by the likes of Pokey LaFarge or Nathaniel Rateliff. “Bluebonnet” has a subtle guitar introduction, but as the song progresses it builds to include horns, piano, organ, and percussion. And “subtlety” could be the best description for the album, as Landon carefully crafted each track to include just what is needed, whether that be mandolin, fiddle, and violin, or just Landon and a piano.

“String My Love” exemplifies Landon’s voice and the piano working together for a song that’s sparse in music but heavy on lyrical depth. The skillful way he presents his lyrics and vocal lines throughout the album creates enough space in his songs that you feel like you lived a lifetime in those lines. It’s a beautiful debut album and one I can’t say enough good things about.

The album was produced by Josiah Rambin and Landon Miller and features musicians Michael Weileder, Dylan Hillman, Will Wright, Gavin McCoy, Jerry Lee II, Chelsea Norman, Andrew Michael Toups, Joshua Waldrop, and Caleb Elliot. The album is available on all streaming platforms and in physical formats through his Bandcamp site. His website also has links to all his social media and tour updates.

https://landonlloydmiller.com/ https://landonlloydmiller.bandcamp.com/


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