Music Reviews
Late Slip

Late Slip

I Love You

Party Mermaid Records

All the songs on I Love You are about that particular emotion. Brooklyn based singer Chelsea Nenni must have had a rough love life, because most of the songs are about relationships that are in various stages of disarray, The only all-in love song is “New York City,” which is a love song to the city and the people who live there.

Chelsea Nenni of Late Slip
courtesy of Howlin’ Wuelf Media
Chelsea Nenni of Late Slip

Late Slip thrives on retro-pop stylings. Nenni sounds like a barely urbanized Wanda Jackson. There is a bit of a country twang to her voice, and her songwriting has rockabilly and doo-wop undertones.

As I mentioned, the songs are pretty much all about romance gone bad. “I’ll Be OK” opens with the couplet “thought he should be with me / but he did not agree.” She sings about putting on a brave face when she’s around her crush. Ultimately, she concedes “I’ll be OK / It just hurts to be rejected.” That’s something we can all relate to.

The tribal beat of “Title Wave” fits the revenge fantasy. She sings about knocking out the Lothario and dreaming that he’ll get hit by a subway train. The reggae-tinged “Mind Your Business,” in turn disses a would-be suitor who won’t leave the singer alone.

The closing track is a fun, cow-punk version of Blondie’s “Heart of Glass.” The song’s theme of broken romance fits the theme of the album. Who knew Blondie would sound so good with the guitar twang turned all the way up?

Late Slip


Recently on Ink 19...

Joe Jackson

Joe Jackson

Event Reviews

Joe Jackson brought his Two Rounds of Racket tour to the Lincoln Theatre in Washington D.C. on Monday. Bob Pomeroy was in the area and caught the show.

Matías Meyer

Matías Meyer

Interviews

With only a week to go before powerful new feature Louis Riel or Heaven Touches The Earth premieres in the Main Slate at UNAM International Film Festival, Lily and Generoso sat down for an in-depth conversation with the film’s director, Matías Meyer.

Mostly True

Mostly True

Print Reviews

Carl F. Gauze reviews the fascinating Mostly True: The West’s Most Popular Hobo Graffiti Magazine, a chronicle of forgotten outsider subculture.

The Tin Star

The Tin Star

Screen Reviews

Anthony Mann’s gorgeous monochrome western, The Tin Star, may have been shot in black and white, but its themes are never that easily defined.

Flipside

Flipside

Screen Reviews

Charles DJ Deppner finds Flipside to be a vital treatise on mortality, creativity, and purpose, disguised as a quirky documentary about a struggling record store.