Letters

Letters

Bogus Bogus Pomp

To the Editor:

I came across an article written by a Mr. Ed Furniture about a recent Ike Willis/Bogus Pomp show, and would like to express my opinion. First of all, WHO is Ed Furniture, and what makes him think he would be on our guest list? Second of all, admission was $15, and not $45 as he states. It is obvious from his comments that he wasn’t at the same show I was. The show consisted of two sets, each lasting one-and-one-half hours with a fifteen minute intermission. During the show, there was very little talking by Ike, and certainly not about goldfish. The show was about music, and that is what was played for a total of three hours.

“Critics,” in general, are individuals who, because of their lack of talent and direction in life, waste their time criticizing others. “Good” critics, if there is such a thing, at least get their facts right before offering an opinion. Mr. Furniture must have been in another dimension, possibly propelled there by his rage at not being considered one of our guests. Poor baby! If you are interested, a video will soon be available depicting what really happened that evening. In fact, it was a great show, and it really is a shame that Mr. Furniture missed the whole thing.

Alex Pasut, Bass player for Bogus Pomp

Ed says: The Bogus Pomp/Ike Willis live review printed in the April issue was intended as an April Fool’s joke. The author, Ed Furniture, offers his sincerest apologies to Bogus Pomp, Ian Koss, and the readers of Ink 19.

That Rev. Jimmy!

To All, This Does Concern:

After perusing through the response given by one Rev. Jimmy Johanesburg regarding the Hare Krishna prophecy, I was only re-affirmed of my belief that only ignorance can take precedence over religion.

In case one’s sense of history has failed them (where as in Rev. JJ’s case it has), the United States of America was founded on freedom of religion, not on freedom to worship one “God” chosen by a majority. Every individual has the prospect to seek beliefs that are beneficial to their soul, not the souls of the masses. Whether it stems from Christianity, Judaism, Hare Krishna, the immensely misunderstood “Satanism,” or any other hiearchal belief system, every individual has the right to make a choice on their religious beliefs.

Before Rev. JJ stands firmly on his claim of brainwashing by the Krishnas, he should research the history of his own religion. Christianity and its bastard offspring have been well documented in the past as a fuel for desecration. Upon setting foot on the “New World,” the natives of this land (with their form of “savage” religion) were beaten and murdered in the name of a deity which, until that time, they knew no existence of. Let’s not forget its sexist exploitation as well. Women have been excluded, raped, and prodded in the name of God and Sin. Priests and Fathers would often have their way with young women behind the closed doors of many convents and religious institutions, and then condemn them as “whores” with no option of salvation.

As far as I am concerned Christianity (and its various altered progeny) is the largest portion of sewage flowing in and out of the orifices of human beings. It has gained acceptance as a false form of repentance for one’s mistakes from which no lessons were learnt. The human mind should be evacuated of this waste and supplemented with more forms of knowledge, art, and moral reciprocity.

To Rev. Jimmy Johanesburg: RELIGION IS POISON.

It is the most potent controlled substance I have ever encountered in my existence, and it is causing the most extreme case of mass hallucination amongst the human race.

Also, regarding the desire to discontinue publishing and retract the original article, Rev JJ should include the First Amendment when reading the constitution.

Timothy G Parrish, Miami, Florida

The letter from Rev. Jimmy was supposed to be an April Fool’s joke. Unfortunately, life is often more surreal than its parodies — what we thought would read as preposterous idiocy is actually a pretty fair assessment of the views of a lot of religious people, judging from your letter and others we received. Though we tried to make Mr. Johanesburg unbelievably stupid (requesting “a statement of regret and public urgency”? Please!), we actually ended up with an all-too-believable stereotype. Your point is still legitimate, however. –Ian

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