Music Reviews

Mary Lou Lord

Got No Shadow

Work

Mary Lou Lord gets some pretty significant buzz from time to time. This is her first major label record after a handful of indie releases, primarily on Kill Rock Stars. Miss Lord writes simple, folky pop songs without the usual granola tendencies most of this kind of stuff tends to slip into. Hailing from Boston, this singer-songwriter easily brings to mind other Boston-based female artists like Juliana Hatfield and Kristen Hersh. There’s more accompanying instruments on this record than on previous Mary Lou Lord releases that I have heard, which may be the product of a bigger recording budget. There’s also a number of cameos, by the likes of Shawn Colvin, Elliot Smith, and Roger McGuinn, to name a few. An above average collection of quiet pop songsLAS


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Interviews

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Joe Jackson

Event Reviews

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Matías Meyer

Interviews

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Print Reviews

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The Tin Star

Screen Reviews

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