Features

Alan Shepard (1923-1998)

A few years ago, I took my son to the Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. I was hoping to ignite in him some of the awe and wonder I had felt as a child, growing up in the space age. He had seen Apollo 13, and was excited to sit in the capsule once graced by Tom Hanks. But other than that, the rest of the trip didn’t do much for him. He’d seen bigger rockets in Star Wars.

But for me, the day brought back the amazement I felt at his age, sitting bleary-eyed in front of the TV as a man walked on the moon. When our tour paused at the Redstone rocket testing site, our guide described how Alan Shepard and the other Mercury astronauts watched the tests from inside a tipped-over railroad car. Seems there wasn’t enough money to build a proper observation area, since the rockets kept blowing up.

Alan Shepard watched those firecrackers explode, and he still strapped his skinny body into one and became the first American in space. Ten years later, at the age of 48, he did it again, becoming one of only a dozen men to walk on the moon. “Hero” is defined as a person of great strength, courage and daring. America has never shined brighter than when it went to the stars. Thank you, Alan Shepard – hero, for starting our journey.


Recently on Ink 19...

Joe Jackson

Joe Jackson

Event Reviews

Joe Jackson brought his Two Rounds of Racket tour to the Lincoln Theatre in Washington D.C. on Monday. Bob Pomeroy was in the area and caught the show.

Matías Meyer

Matías Meyer

Interviews

With only a week to go before powerful new feature Louis Riel or Heaven Touches The Earth premieres in the Main Slate at UNAM International Film Festival, Lily and Generoso sat down for an in-depth conversation with the film’s director, Matías Meyer.

Mostly True

Mostly True

Print Reviews

Carl F. Gauze reviews the fascinating Mostly True: The West’s Most Popular Hobo Graffiti Magazine, a chronicle of forgotten outsider subculture.

The Tin Star

The Tin Star

Screen Reviews

Anthony Mann’s gorgeous monochrome western, The Tin Star, may have been shot in black and white, but its themes are never that easily defined.

Flipside

Flipside

Screen Reviews

Charles DJ Deppner finds Flipside to be a vital treatise on mortality, creativity, and purpose, disguised as a quirky documentary about a struggling record store.