Music Reviews

“lord_high_fixers”

The Lord High Fixers

Is Your Club a Secret Weapon?

Estrus

All these years I’ve been thinking of the Lord High Fixers as just your average hoodlum rock band, the sort of stuff that grabs you by the shirt collar and shakes you until you feel obligated to pump your feet in agreement. Is Your Club a Secret Weapon? is more interesting than that, borrowing tunes from a lot of sources, many of them obscure to me, and craftily splicing them between the Lord High Fixers’ guaranteed raveups. For example, the album opens with a brief but spooky interpretation of Dylan’s “The Times They Are A Changin’.” Keeping with the retro vibe, the Fixers take on Gil Scott Heron’s classic “Revolution WIll Not Be Televised.” “We Want, We Would Appreciate” proffers sage advice on top of a set of loops and turntablism. Alice Cooper’s “18” is also given a whirl, but the bulk of the message here is that of revolution and activism. And of course, the Lord High Fixers’ songs are all flame-spewing, rubber-burning rock punk numbers that will make you get off your ass and do something about it. A fantastic mix of influences and styles that does not lose the will to shake your moneymaker – highly recommended.

Estrus Records, P.O. Box 2125, Bellingham, WA 98225; http://www.estrus.com


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