Music Reviews

Gary Numan

Warriors

Beggars Banquet

Critics suck. They saw the cover of this album (which, admittedly, DOES make Numan look like a Road Warrior wannabe) and decided that the music within was attempting to emulate the look. This is so far away from the truth that it had to dial “011” when attempting to even say hello to the truth. All Warriors is is a great Gary Numan record, which means that it’s a great record full stop.

Warriors is packed with great songs, none of which mention Thunderdome, but it suffers from an identity crisis: Numan hired Be-Bop Deluxe guitar man Bill Nelson to co-create the songs with him, but then fought Nelson all the way and ended up only using some of his work and erasing others and generally (say the notes) losing interest in some of the songs altogether. This was stupid of Numan, because Nelson was a GREAT choice, and some of these songs sound fab because of his twangy guitar heroics. But you can only really hear what might have been on the bonus tracks: “My Car Slides (1)” is frozen nightmare shit with some really screwy-beautiful chordwork by Nelson, and “My Car Slides (2)” turns all kind of Yakety-Sax on the same idea.

As for the real originally release album itself (fall of 1983, actually), the songs are hard-edged plodding stubborn I’m-trying-not-to-be-human-because-it-hurts-too-much Numan funk. The title track bumps along nicely, but it’s probably the most boring thing here. Much much better are songs like the sci-fi narrative “I Am Render” and the stomping eight and a half minute “Sister Surprise.” Numan flirts with cabaret stylings on the metronomic “Love is Like Clock Law,” and the last song, “The Rhythm of the Evening,” has everything from Bootsy-like bass and wailing saxophone to James Brown chicken-scratch guitar.

Best of all, though, is “My Centurion.” It’s terrifying, it’s confusing (are they dying? is their relationship ending? who the hell is his centurion?), and it rocks harder than you might think. It’s not the centerpiece of Warriors, but it’s the best song from the ’80s that none of us ever heard.

Beggars Banquet: http://www.beggars.com/us


Recently on Ink 19...

Matías Meyer

Matías Meyer

Interviews

With only a week to go before powerful new feature Louis Riel or Heaven Touches The Earth premieres in the Main Slate at UNAM International Film Festival, Lily and Generoso sat down for an in-depth conversation with the film’s director, Matías Meyer.

Mostly True

Mostly True

Print Reviews

Carl F. Gauze reviews the fascinating Mostly True: The West’s Most Popular Hobo Graffiti Magazine, a chronicle of forgotten outsider subculture.

The Tin Star

The Tin Star

Screen Reviews

Anthony Mann’s gorgeous monochrome western, The Tin Star, may have been shot in black and white, but its themes are never that easily defined.

Flipside

Flipside

Screen Reviews

Charles DJ Deppner finds Flipside to be a vital treatise on mortality, creativity, and purpose, disguised as a quirky documentary about a struggling record store.

Stereophonic

Stereophonic

Music News

Tony-nominated smash success Stereophonic delivers a brand-new Broadway cast recording — straight from 1976.

Cocoa the Tour Dog

Cocoa the Tour Dog

Print Reviews

Cocoa the Tour Dog is the heartwarming true story of a boy and his dog and his reggae band. Bob Pomeroy reviews the book by Adam Mansbach and reggae artist Stick Figure, with illustrations by Juan Manuel Orozco.

TRF Boog

TRF Boog

Features

First Single “Dump It” from TRF Boog’s forthcoming ME vs ME LP premieres today, at Ink 19.

Melt-Banana

Melt-Banana

Event Reviews

Veteran Tokyo punk band Melt-Banana brings Tomato Flower and Baby; Baby: Explores the Reasons Why that Gum is Still on the Sidewalk to Denver, Colorado, for an all-out punk feast. Meow.