Music Reviews

The Brother Kite / Vaguely Starshaped

Split 7”

Losing Blueprint

Vaguely Starshaped is a band of emo power poppers who have a knack for creating very catchy hooks, while not sacrificing the rock in the process. Their song here, “Pretty Early,” could pass for a Jimmy Eat World rip off or a nice Sum 41 b-side. If they’re going for big time radio air-play, then this is one that could easily garner a lot of attention from the teenie-boppers: it rocks fairly well, and is very catchy.

The Brother Kite appear to have more of a flair for layered indie rock, ala Daydream Nation-era Sonic Youth, crossed with the vocal stylings of Polvo or Apples in Stereo. “Misery Walk” is a really dreamy, propulsive rocker that takes the listener through a lovely trip of pretty birds, clouds and otherworldly peace. Their sound kind of reminds me of Ride or Curve, which is always good!

The artwork to this 7” is spectacular: a simple design on off yellow paper, featuring an olive green, night-time scene of pine trees in the snow. It’s really beautiful. To summarize, this is a fun little 7” with lovely artwork that won’t change the world, but is definitely worth a listen.

The Losing Blueprint Records: http://www.losingblueprint.com/


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