Music Reviews

The Moto-Litas

The Moto-Litas

Someone give this Atlanta foursome a record deal! The Moto-Litas already have one fine full-length to show for themselves, but this 6-track EP seriously demonstrates the band’s increased strength and their unique musical scope. While the Moto-Litas’ roots lie in garage rock, they owe as much to Seventies hard rock, stoner and late-‘80s fuzz pop, coming across like indie rock’s answer to Joan Jett, or like the Bangles teaming up with classic-era Black Sabbath. A more concise reference point may be Queens of the Stone Age, with (even) greater pop sensibilities. In particular, the compact rhythms, the fierce but controlled guitars and the way the vocals slide on top of these dense, widescreen desert sounds are at times very similar to Homme and Olivieri’s last two albums. And for all their genre-breaching adventurousness, the Moto-Litas have delivered a remarkably consistent set. Of the six tracks on here, only the closing “Shock Me” is less than stunning – and even that one serves a purpose in the way it opens up another possible musical road for the band, further blending darkness with beauty, and melding smooth pop melodies with claustrophobic hard rock.

The Moto-Litas: http://www.motolitas.com/


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