Music Reviews
Rise Against

Rise Against

Siren Song of the Counter-Culture

Geffen

Man, these guys are good. Rise Against are one of those rare bands that can jump to a major label and not start to suck immediately. With Siren Song of the Counter Culture, Rise Against ups the ante for major label punk, both musically and politically.

I’m sure that all the “true punks” out there will slam Rise Against for the fact that this release isn’t as aggressive as some of their previous stuff, not to mention that there are very some poppy numbers here. But, give me a break! Yes, this isn’t as tough as their last record for Fat Wreck Chords, but it’s still a zillion times better than the majority of “major label punk.” These guys bring a political message to the minds of teenagers, who typically find politics boring. The message they bring comes atop a bed of gnarly guitars, catchy hooks and lead vocals that recall Zach de la Rocha.

This may not be the best Rise Against record of their three, but I’m reviewing this with a slanted eye. The songs on Siren Song of the Counter Culture rock out, and in a major way. You can sing along, run around and freak out to these songs without much effort. The guitars bite with buzzsaw precision. They sound so darn good, I want to cry! The drummer is a human jackhammer, and the high quality production of a major label release really brings him to the forefront. Regardless of the slander now brought to their name, Rise Against still has the passion that made their first two records so good.

Wouldn’t you rather have your 13 year old little brother listening to these guys than Simple Plan? Major label or not, Rise Against still rocks out. They are, by far, the least evil of major label bands currently moving units under the moniker of “punk.”

Geffen: http://www.geffen.com


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