Music Reviews
Thursday

Thursday

A City by the Light Divided

Island/Def Jam Records

I’ll be the first to admit that I jumped on the Thursday wagon a bit late – after the 2003 release of War All the Time. There was something about the songs that screamed to me. I did my homework, tracked down their other releases and engulfed myself into their musical utopia. So when I heard that their fourth release, A City by the Light Divided, would be released in May, I found myself wanting to posses it. I had heard several new tracks back at their holiday concert in December; surely, Thursday would not disappoint me, right? I bought the album and mysteriously found myself somewhat mesmerized by the twelve tracks. The sound is still Thursday – but better. It’s more raw, more emotional, more surprising. Listening to each track, I found myself liking each song even more than the last. It was like a gift that kept on giving. The album has a little something for everyone: the catchy “Counting 5-4-3-2-1” to the impassioned “Autumn Leaves Revisited.” This is definitely their best work to date. A City by The Light Divided is proof that things do get better with age, and Thursday is no exception.

Thursday: http://www.thursday.net


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