Music Reviews
Trans Am

Trans Am

Sex Change

Thrill Jockey Records

Trans Am has been crafting synth-and-drum obsessed albums since the early ’90s. And like everything great to come out of the ’90s, there is a bit of self-conscience irony in their sound, like they know full well that they are channeling every pop group since the Beach Boys. And that’s cool. But like a John Barth novel, their postmodern experiments just aren’t completely pleasing in a superficial way. They take time. And Trans Am’s latest Sex Change is no different; after a couple plays, this album just leaves me saying “I don’t know.”

Like all things postmodern, you must understand the larger picture to be in on the joke. Apparently, Trans Am’s previous album Liberation was more politically charged than any of their previous material. Basically, they were fed up with the W and his lackeys (or is it the other way around?) and decided to express their frustration in their music, an activity that was very popular in a previous era known as the “‘60s.” And like almost everyone else in America, the recent political climate had finally taken its toll. So the trio parted ways for two years, finally regrouping in Australia to jam on some else’s synthisizers, drums and guitars. The result is Sex Change.

Hey wait a minute; That’s it! You know what this album is like? Its like in the movies when an obvious underdog like Rocky or the Mighty Ducks practice really hard and the music is dramatic and energizing, and then after only three minutes, they are way better and ready to kick ass. That’s exactly what this album is: 2007’s totally self-aware musical interlude. No matter how Phillip K. Dick-ian our world becomes, Trans Am believes all any of us ever really needs is a musical interlude, a time to learn how to kick ass. And Sex Change may be that album… or you could just rock out to !!!’s latest instead.

Thrill Jockey: http://www.thrilljockey.com/


Recently on Ink 19...

Gasoline Lollipops

Gasoline Lollipops

Features

Gasoline Lollipops’ newest single, “Freedom Don’t Come Easy,” is today’s mother lovin’ punk rock folk anthem.

Basket Case

Basket Case

Screen Reviews

Frank Henenlotter’s gory grindhouse classic Basket Case looks as grimy as the streets of Times Square, and that is one of the film’s greatest assets. Arrow Video gives this unlikely candidate a welcome fresh release.

Jimmy Failla

Jimmy Failla

Event Reviews

Despite the Mother’s Day factor, hundreds of fervent, faithful followers still flocked to Orlando’s famed Plaza Live to catch an earlybird set from Jimmy Failla — one of the hottest names on today’s national comedy scene.

Lonnie Walker

Lonnie Walker

Features

Ink 19 readers get an early listen and look at “Cool Sparkling Water,” a new single from Lonnie Walker.

Los Lobos

Los Lobos

Event Reviews

Jeremy Glazier has a bucket list day at a Los Lobos 50th Anniversary show in Davenport, Iowa.

Always… Patsy Cline

Always… Patsy Cline

Archikulture Digest

Carl F. Gauze reviews the not-quite one-woman show, Always… Patsy Cline, based on the true story of Cline’s friendship with Louise Seger, who met the star in l961 and corresponded with Cline until her death.

Lorraine of the Lions

Lorraine of the Lions

Screen Reviews

A lady Tarzan and her gorilla have a rough time adapting to high society in Lorraine of the Lions (1925), one of four silent films on Accidentally Preserved: Volume 5, unleashed by Ben Model and Undercrank Productions, with musical scores by Jon C. Mirsalis.