Music Reviews
Ghostland Observatory

Ghostland Observatory

Robotique Majestique

Trashy Moped

While listening to a Ghostland Observatory CD is far from the mind-altering experience of seeing this electronic/blues rock/soul duo tear it up in person, Robotique Majestique is nonetheless a comfortable place to entertain your ears until the band comes through your town on their next tour.

As a whole, the band’s third release is not without its flaws. “Opening Credits,” Dancing on My Grave,” “Holy Ghost White Noise,” and “Club Soda” are pretty much throwaways that will probably not make the cut into your iPod playlist. However, in between these mostly instrumental, often disco-ized cuts are some thirst-quenching songs sure to plant themselves in your head pretty quickly.

“Freeheart Lover” may not be the strongest song these Texas dudes have written, but damned if I can stop humming it.

At its base, Ghostland Observatory is the work of producer/drummer Thomas Turner and his Daft Punk inspired electronic impulses. If that was all this band had to offer, I would have lost interest within seconds. What pulls me in is the soulful shriek of vocalist Aaron Behrens and the blues punk that he squeezes out of his guitar. Though the guitar elements aren’t as much in the forefront on Robotique Majestique, they do play a more central role when the songs are played live.

The best songs on here are “Heavy Heart,” “The Band Marches On,” and “HFM.”

Ghostland Observatory: http://www.ghostlandobservatory.net


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