Music Reviews
The Heavy

The Heavy

Great Vengeance and Furious Fire

Counter

The title of The Heavy’s introduction to the world of label land invokes mental images of a Jheri curled Samuel L. Jackson, eyes wide and spewing biblical verses at a man he’s about to shoot. Great Vengeance and Furious Fire, when thrown on the stereo, continues the ’70s soulful exploitation film/Tarantino vibe that its title inspires. Any band that can get me thinking about Pulp Fiction is a band worth listening to!

This British import hails from the countryside of Bath, though the music sounds as if it were dredged up from the dirt and grime of a big city red light district. Steeped in the sexual falsetto of a dude named Swaby, and layered deep with soul and funk rarely played with as much conviction as The Heavy manages, these ten songs accomplish what a band like Louis XIV hinted at over the course of two full albums.

Not every song reaches levels of brilliance, but even when this band takes cheeky chances, as on the slow candid rap of “Girl,” it’s still sincere enough to end up adoring.

The opening half of this album is the strongest. “Brukpocket’s Lament,” “Coleen,” “Set Me Free,” “That Kind of Man,” and “Doing Fine” would have made one flawless EP. Though the second half loses a bit of its punch, this album is still one fierce release.

The Heavy: http://www.myspace.com/theheavy73


Recently on Ink 19...

Henry V

Henry V

Archikulture Digest

Blood, guts, and kicking butt in France — it’s the age-old story of Shakespeare. Carl F. Gauze once again enjoys the salacious violence and complicated plot points of Henry V, in the moody dark of Orlando Shakes.

New Music Now 011: Nora O’Connor

New Music Now 011: Nora O’Connor

Features

On today’s New Music Now, Judy Craddock talks to our musical guest, Nora O’Connor, about her solo album, My Heart, and the captivating new music she’s listening to right now. Tune in for great music, and more ’90s references than you can shake a scrunchie at.

Big Time Gambling Boss

Big Time Gambling Boss

Screen Reviews

Writer Kazuo Kasahara and director Kôsaku Yamashita transcend genre conventions to create the memorable film Big Time Gambling Boss. Phil Bailey reviews.

Frank Bello

Frank Bello

Features

Frank Bello’s new memoir Fathers, Brothers, and Sons: Surviving Anguish, Abandonment, and Anthrax takes us from a New York childhood, to Anthrax stadium tours, to fatherhood with the charming informality of a conversation with an old friend. Then I’m Gone, Bello’s first solo EP, provides accompaniment. Joe Frietze reviews.

%d bloggers like this: