Truth to Power

Portrait of a horrible person: Lynndie England

She sounds like the textbook definition of a sociopath:

Why the hell should I feel sorry, says girl soldier who abused Iraqi prisoners at Abu Ghraib prison

…England, now 26 and without a boyfriend – though she receives marriage proposals from twisted internet admirers – says she is depressed because she feels trapped and has lost her independence.

‘I can’t even hunt squirrels no more, because I’m not permitted to own a firearm,’ she moans.

As a result of post-traumatic stress, she says, she also suffers flashbacks and horribly vivid nightmares.

Do they reawaken memories of those chilling photograph sessions at Abu Ghraib?

‘It’s a whole variety of stuff. You can’t hear somebody screaming their heads off and not dream about it,’ she drawls sardonically.

‘I’ll be watching a movie, or TV, and then something triggers it and, bam! I’m back there.’

This hardly sounds like contrition, but is probably as close as Private First Class Lynndie England will ever come to expressing regret for becoming the unacceptable face of the U.S. Army. </em>

It was people like this that allowed the cruelty of Cheney and Rumsfeld to occur- and be assured that those in power counted on the moral vapidness of scum like England to be the face of the US presence in Iraq. Because Abu Ghraib and the torture program wasn’t about security and information gathering- it was about revenge. Ask any of these hillbilly Hitlers if they feel remorse over their actions, and they’ll say the prisoners deserved it because of “what they did on 9/11”. Betcha.


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