Screen Reviews
Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami

Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami

directed by Sophie Fiennes

starring Grace Jones

Blinder Films, Sligoville, Amoeba Film

Grace Jones really knows how to wear a hat. Jones found fame in late 1970’s singing hits like “Night Clubbing” and “Warm Leatherette.” She modeled, sang, and starred in questionable action movies. Today we follow her to native Jamaica where she’s recording with local musicians. Her working vacation mixes family visits with multiple performances of her hits and yet-to-be hits. Being Grace Jones takes more effort than you can imagine. Her extensive, caring family is full of sinners and saints. She does nothing by half measures. And she’s cool being interviews in the nude. The performance segments are grand, the family stuff difficult to decode with the Jamaican accents and lack of any explanation. Make sure to stick around for the credits, there’s one final number and her costume is a must see.

https://www.floridafilmfestival.com/


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