The Reverend Vince Anderson and His Love Choir

The Reverend Vince Anderson and His Love Choir

The 13th Apostle

Dirty Gospel

O Lord, help me to be pure, but not yet,” says St. Augustine, a sentiment reinforced by Reverend Vince Anderson and his Love Choir on this release. Described elsewhere as swamp gospel, and by The Reverend as Dirty Gospel, The 13th Apostle positively revels in a boozy, bluesy fandango that shakes and quakes as The Reverend bears his testament. Picking up where he left off on his last release, I Need Jesus, Reverend Anderson provides a bourbon soaked “Pilgrim’s Progress” that stretches through dark bars and the abandoned haunts of forgotten loves. Although the album begins with the rollicking number, “Dear Lunatics,” The Reverend’s talent is most apparent when he slows things down a bit on the piano ballad, “Angel, Save My Breath,” and “Honeywell Street Bridge.” Often compared to Tom Waits (a comparison most apparent on “Darlin'”), The Reverend’s talent eschews the surrealistic and bizarre elements apparent in Waits’ most recent recordings. While he may sound like Waits in his gravelly voice, lyrically, his vision resembles none other than mavericks such as Johnny Cash. For example, his ability to provide “tears in your beers” songs, Dixieland jazz based and the occasional foray into light humor. All carried out with a certain amount of flare and aplomb. How many preachers do you know that could lead the choir in singing a track like “Sweet Redemption,” only to follow it up with a track, “Tryin’ to Be an Asshole (But I Got Jesus in My Head).” Next time you’re at your choir practice, bang out a few bars of that, Jack! All told, The Reverend Vince Anderson combines a true believer’s convictions with a gift to make it believable unlike the anemic Christian pop being passed around. Brother, pass the collection plate!

The Reverend Vince Anderson: http://www.reverendvince.com

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