Music Reviews

Committed To Rock

Various Artists

Time Life/BMG

This compilation, which is meant to be “a soundtrack that inspires youth to reach higher and make positive life choices,” will probably go down well with Clear Channel executives currently on a mission to clean up the airwaves. Whether it has the same effect on the record-buying public remains to be seen.

With contributions from Lifehouse, Jars of Clay and Creed, there’s a blatant Christian agenda to this collection (put together by former Ambrosia frontman David Pack), but with hits such as “Alive” by P.O.D., “Wherever You Will Go” by The Calling and “Learn to Fly” by Foo Fighters, the album could appeal to a cross-section of non-religious modern rock enthusiasts despite the fact most of the songs and bands here date back a couple of years.

However, they may not be so keen to buy into Pack’s so-called vision of “positivity,” which this album offers with an almost evangelical zeal; nor might they agree with the way the album claims ownership of such non-spiritual tracks as Fatboy Slim’s “Praise You” or Lit’s “My Own Worst Enemy.” Music should inspire youngsters and can do it in a variety of ways, but I’m not sure whether such a packaged, contrived and even nauseating compilation (which Pack says is “united in spirit”) is the correct vehicle to do so.

Committed to Rock: http://www.TimeLife.com/c2r/


Recently on Ink 19...

New Music Now 008: doubleVee

New Music Now 008: doubleVee

Features

Join Ink 19 with Barb and Allan Vest for new music from Sydney, Australia band Bloods, Prey composer Sarah Schachner, and doubleVee’s own latest release, Treat Her Strangely. What was your first cassette tape, hmm?

Hold Me Tight

Hold Me Tight

Screen Reviews

Lily and Generoso review Hold Me Tight, the sixth feature directed by renowned actor Mathieu Amalric. Centered around a brilliant performance from Vicky Krieps (Phantom Thread, Bergman Island), Hold Me Tight is an unpredictable and remarkable psychological drama.

Sirens

Sirens

Screen Reviews

The fact that the band Slaves to Sirens exists is impressive, but that they live, love, and breathe to play metal takes things to another level. Sirens documents the journey. Review by Charles DJ Deppner.