Music Reviews
Great Lakes Myth Society

Great Lakes Myth Society

Compass Rose Bouquet

Quack Media

Great Lakes Myth Society enjoy all of the southern comfort of an Americana band (banjo, mandolin, accordion, piano, folk ballads and pretty melodies with a slight twang) without falling into the traps of the genre – in other words, they’re not annoying or boring.

The Ann Arbor, Michigan band has just released a smart, backwoods, expansive record reminiscent of The Decemberists and mid-career R.E.M. on their sophomore disc, Compass Rose Bouquet. The whole of the album is a perfect collection of old harmonizing rock ‘n’ roll from the beginning of its time (The Beach Boys, The Beatles) and the 21st century poetry of twentysomethings observing life.

The song that really got me upon the first listen was opening track “Heydays.” It’s a nostalgic look back on youth that’s passing. The line “bands that you loved were just haircuts and jackets/ Back then that was enough” has such a melancholic jab as to almost pull tears. “Uncertain the future, nostalgic the past/ Unable to recognize moments that pass.” Timothy Monger (one half of the singer/brother team that heads up GLMS) has written a modern day “Glory Days” (which has always been my favorite Bruce Springsteen song).

I could easily go song by song, lyric by lyric, raving about how timeless of a record this little Northern Michigan band has just made, but I’ll spare you the heady text and allow you this moment to follow the link and purchase the album.

Great Lakes Myth Society: http://www.greatlakesmythsociety.com


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