Music Reviews
Elektric Voodoo

Elektric Voodoo

Telescope

Illusion Tournet Records

I’m having a rough time of it these plague times. The pandemic, the Western states running out of water, the general lack of civility and sanity in our public discourse, it’s enough to sink someone into a deep depression. Scott Tournet, the primary songwriter of Elektric Voodoo has fought with depression and addiction. Telescope emerged as a concept album about changing perspectives and changing lives.

Scott told Relix Magazine that the first six songs started off being about his struggles with addiction and depression. Once the songs went through the woodshed with the rest of Elektric Voodoo, the struggle to find purpose became thoroughly mixed with the lyrical despair. “Chasing Ghosts” opens the album with an infectious blend of Afrobeat, Santana and jam band rock and roll. The charging Latin/African percussion, bright horns and guitars inspired by the desert blues players of Mali and a shock to the nervous system intended to get the body moving. The protagonist of our story has his epiphany on the title track. On “Telescope” Scott sings, “I’ve been peering through a telescope… looking at the world up close… but never opening up both eyes.”

The tone of the lyrics shift dramatically when the songs switch focus from jnternal contemplation to opening up to the larger world out there. “People of Earth” “reflects what psychologists call the “overview effect syndrome” among astronauts. The astronauts are profoundly moved by seeing the world as a blue world floating in the darkness of space. “People of Earth” is told by someone who hitched a ride on a spaceship. Looking back to the planet, he asks, “are we from America? Are we from North Africa? People of the Earth, they all belong.” Telescope closes with an ode top hope and optimism, “Children Are the Revolution,” At the risk of sounding all hippy dippy, Scott proclaims, “always take the path of kindness, Love shines through it all.” Scott finds hope in young people like Greta Thunberg, the Parkland students who founded March for Our Lives and Malala Yousafzai. They are our hope. Hope that they’ll be able to get this world on a better path.

https://www.elektricvoodoo.com


Recently on Ink 19...

Porn and Ice Cream

Porn and Ice Cream

Screen Reviews

Three aimless misfits find themselves a purpose when they unwittingly start a band. It’s not your typical rock story, as Ian Koss explains.

Fire and Iceland

Fire and Iceland

Interviews

New York filmmaker April Anderson talks with Bob Pomeroy about volcanoes, horses, and making documentaries in Iceland.

Best of Film 2022

Best of Film 2022

Screen Reviews

With a year of festival and microcinema screenings behind them, Lily and Generoso select and review their ten favorite films, six supplemental features, and one exceptional repertory release of 2022.

Laura Citarella

Laura Citarella

Interviews

Director Laura Citarella, of the famed filmmaking collective El Pampero Cine, has created with her newest feature Trenque Lauquen a provocative transformation of her protagonist Laura (Laura Parades), whom Citarella first introduced in her 2011 film Ostende. Lily and Generoso enjoyed an in-depth conversation with Citarella about Trenque Lauquen when it screened at AFI Fest 2022.

New Music Now 009: Sleepyhead

New Music Now 009: Sleepyhead

Features

Join us for a new edition of New Music Now, with our special musical guest, Sleepyhead. All three members of the band are school teachers, so you didn’t hear it from us, but there might be a pop quiz about their album New Alchemy after the show.

Joana Pimenta

Joana Pimenta

Interviews

Back in 2018, Lily and Generoso selected Adirley Queirós’s Once There Was Brasilia as a top ten film. That feature’s cinematographer, Joana Pimenta, has now co-directed with Queirós one of the most expansive political films we’ve seen this year, Dry Ground Burning. Lily and Generoso interviewed Pimenta at AFI Fest earlier this month.

%d bloggers like this: